Takfiri groups in Nigeria are carrying out false-flag operations in an attempt to pave the way for US intervention in the African country, experts tell Press TV1.

The comments came on Tuesday after Washington said it was going to help find more than 200 schoolgirls kidnapped by the members of the Boko Haram militant group.

“People should understand that Boko Haram is nothing more than a bunch of mercenaries. They have no relation to Islam. They are backed by Takfiri organisations such as al-Qaeda,” said Islamic scholar Shabir Hassanally, adding, “It’s very very interesting how, all of a sudden, this phantom Boko Haram… come into play and… the most polite and nice government of America… is suddenly there to lend its assistance.”

“Why is America all of a sudden concerned about Nigeria? Nigeria is extremely wealthy and America is after its own interests.”

Kevin Barret, the director of truthjihad.com, also slammed the West’s role in promoting Takfiri militants throughout history.

“The British are making common cause with the Wahhabis of Saudi Arabia and using them against the Islamic empire of the time, the Ottoman Empire. That’s where these Takfiri groups are coming from and they have been manufactured over the past several centuries,” Barret said.

“This Boko Haram group does appear to be, at least in part, a false flag designed to legitimise US imperial intervention in Nigeria,” added the former university lecturer.

On May 6, US President Barack Obama said in a TV interview that Washington was going to help find the 276 girls still held captive after being kidnapped.

In mid-April, Boko Haram committed mass abduction of teenage schoolgirls from Chibok school in northeastern Borno state, of whom 276 remain missing after 53 escaped.

Boko Haram — whose name means “Western education is forbidden” — says its goal is to overthrow the Nigerian government.

The group has claimed responsibility for a number of deadly gun and bomb attacks in various parts of Nigeria since 2009.

Over the past four years, violence in the north of Africa’s most populous country has claimed the lives of 3,600 people, including killings by the security forces.

Footnotes

  1. This interview was conducted by Press TV on May 14, 2014, an archive copy of the story is available on Taghrib News

Written by Shabbir Hassanally

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